Books received – Derrida/Roudinesco, Nichols, Brennan, Neocleous, Shell, Society and Space

photoIn all that packaging were four books from Stanford University Press in recompense for review work – Derrida/Roudinesco, For What Tomorrow… ; Timothy Brennan, Borrowed Light: Vico, Hegel and the Colonies; Robert Nichols, The World of Freedom: Heidegger, Foucault, and the Politics of Historical Ontology; and Marc Shell, Islandology: Geography, Rhetoric, Politics. Mark Neocleous generously sent me a copy of his latest book – War Power, Police Power, and the new issue of Society and Space also arrived today.

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Posted in Books, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Jacques Derrida, Mark Neocleous, Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault, Society and Space | 1 Comment

Is this much packaging really necessary?

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Only four books in all this packaging…

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Edward S. Casey and Mary Watkins, Up Against the Wall

Out in the next couple of weeks – the much-anticipated Edward S. Casey and Mary Watkins, Up Against the Wall: Re-Imagining the US-Mexico Border

9780292758414As increasing global economic disparities, violence, and climate change provoke a rising tide of forced migration, many countries and local communities are responding by building walls—literal and metaphorical—between citizens and newcomers. Up Against the Wall: Re-imagining the U.S.-Mexico Border examines the temptation to construct such walls through a penetrating analysis of the U.S. wall at the U.S.-Mexico border, as well as investigating the walling out of Mexicans in local communities. Calling into question the building of a wall against a friendly neighboring nation, Up Against the Wall offers an analysis of the differences between borders and boundaries. This analysis opens the way to envisioning alternatives to the stark and policed divisions that are imposed by walls of all kinds. Tracing the consequences of imperialism and colonization as citizens grapple with new migrant neighbors, the book paints compelling examples from key locales affected by the wall—Nogales, Arizona vs. Nogales, Sonora; Tijuana/San Diego; and the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. An extended case study of Santa Barbara describes the creation of an internal colony in the aftermath of the U.S. conquest of Mexican land, a history that is relevant to many U.S. cities and towns.

Ranging from human rights issues in the wake of massive global migration to the role of national restorative shame in the United States for the treatment of Mexicans since 1848, the authors delve into the broad repercussions of the unjust and often tragic consequences of excluding others through walled structures along with the withholding of citizenship and full societal inclusion. Through the lens of a detailed examination of forced migration from Mexico to the United States, this transdisciplinary text, drawing on philosophy, psychology, and political theory, opens up multiple insights into how nations and communities can coexist with more justice and more compassion.
Posted in Boundaries, Edward Casey, Politics, Territory | 1 Comment

Heidegger’s Gesamtausgabe and its English translations – two bibliographies

Thomas Sheehan has provided a bibliography of ‘Heidegger’s Gesamtausgabe and its English translations‘ in Continental Philosophy Review (requires subscription). Thanks to the Enowning blog for the link – the post there points to this free, online, bibliography which covers similar ground.

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CFP ‘Time Served: Discipline and Punish forty years on’ – 11-12 Sept 2015, The Galleries of Justice, Nottingham, UK

Posted on behalf of Sophie Fuggle – a call for papers for a fascinating sounding Foucault conference next year, in an intriguing venue. I’ll be giving one of the plenary talks.

Time Served: Discipline and Punish forty years on
11-12 September 2015, The Galleries of Justice, Nottingham, UK

40 years after it was first published in French, the impact of Michel Foucault’s seminal text Discipline and Punish on theories of incarceration, discipline and power remains largely unchallenged. The aim of this conference is to revisit the text in light of the past four decades of penal developments, public debate and social consciousness on incarceration as it continues to constitute society’s mode of punishment par excellence.

In addition to thinking through the legacy of Discipline and Punish and its continued relevance today, specific focus will be given to the text itself, its position within Foucault’s wider critical project and its important relationship with his activism most notably the work of the GIP [Groupe d’Information sur les prisons] during the early 1970s. For example, the publication in 2013 of his 1973 lectures at the Collège de France on La Société Punitive, calls for a return to this period and a new engagement with Foucault’s work on prisons, not least in its pursuit of a more openly Marxist critique of the relationship between incarceration and bourgeois capital accumulation.

Here, attention should also be paid to Foucault’s methodology in researching and writing the text. Discipline and Punish marks his movement from an archeological to a genealogical approach towards what he terms the ‘history of the present.’ What is at stake in this shift and how effective is his genealogical method for thinking through the material and discursive structures of incarceration operating within our own society and moment? How does the juxtaposition set up between the torture and killing of Damiens and the prison timetable of the book’s opening raise important questions not simply about punishment but the role of representation – images and narratives of incarceration – in framing public consciousness about the space of the prison?

It is hoped that the conference will bring together a range of participants: scholars working in the fields of philosophy, sociology, criminology, urban geography, architecture, history, literature, media studies as well as artists, writers and activists involved in projects based in and about prisons and their conditions.

If you would like to offer a paper or other form of intervention, please send us a 250 word abstract along with your name, e-mail and (if relevant) institutional affiliation by 1st March 2015. If you would like to organize a panel of 3 or 4 presenters, please also send a panel title along with the abstracts and contact details.

E-mail: sophie.fuggle@ntu.ac.uk

The conference is organized by Nottingham Trent University and will be held at the Galleries of Justice in Nottingham.

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Between Truth and Power: Latour’s Political Philosophy

stuartelden:

Graham Harman talks about his latest book on Bruno Latour at the Pluto Press blog.

Originally posted on Pluto Press - Independent Progressive Publishing:

by Graham Harman

‘In Bruno Latour: Reassembling the Political, I claim that Latour’s approach to political theory poses a strong challenge to reigning paradigms in the discipline. Politics since the French Revolution, whatever the complexities of any given historical moment, has habitually been carved up into “Left” and “Right” orientations. Indeed, this is how all of us instinctively classify each person we meet in political terms. As Emerson famously put it, every nation has its progressives (“The Party of Hope”) and its conservatives (“The Party of Memory”). Bruno Latour has always been difficult to place on this familiar spectrum. Clearly he is not a radical Leftist, having little in common with Jacobin countrymen such as Alain Badiou and Jacques Rancière, who are prepared to sacrifice everything in the name of egalitarian principle. In fact, Latour is sometimes tarred by the Left as a “neo-liberal,” though this label is always…

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Audio recordings of the Emory conference on Heidegger’s ‘Black Notebooks’

The audio files for the Emory University Conference “Heidegger’s Black Notebooks: Philosophy, Politics, Anti-Semitism” –which were already available on iTunes–  have also been uploaded on YouTube. Thanks to Philippe Theophanidis for the links.

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