Interview on ‘Foucault’s Last Decade’ at Critical Theory

I’m interviewed over at Critical-Theory.com about Foucault’s Last Decade – the first of a few discussions on the book and its subject matter. Many thanks to Eugene Wolters for the interest in my work and asking the questions in this interview.

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Michel Foucault died in 1984, at the age of 57, leaving much of his work unfinished. At the time of his death, he was still working on additional volumes of The History of Sexuality series, leaving behind an incomplete fourth volume and countless notes, writings and lectures around the subjects he planned to cover.

Stuart Elden, in his latest book “Foucault’s Last Decade,” meticulously pieces together Foucault’s work in the last 10 years of his life.  Elden draws heavily from Foucault’s lectures at the Collège de France, where many of his ideas were tested and refined, along with archival material and his already published work. “Foucault’s Last Decade” provides an invaluable resource for scholars interested in Foucault’s later work, and the projects he had hoped to undertake. [continues here]

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This entry was posted in Foucault's Last Decade, Foucault: The Birth of Power, Michel Foucault, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Interview on ‘Foucault’s Last Decade’ at Critical Theory

  1. Pingback: Interview on ‘Foucault’s Last Decade’ at Critical Theory — Progressive Geographies | multipliciudades

  2. a_visitor says:

    Hi Stuart, as I don’t know where else to ask this, I might try here – I hope you dont mind me doing so: is it possible to access the original French audio recordings of Foucault’s lectures somewhere? Are they being digitised?

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