Law and Humanities Summer School, University of Hong Kong, 8-13 June 2020

Law and Humanities Summer School, University of Hong Kong, 8-13 June 2020

The Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Arts at the University of Hong Kong will hold its first law and humanities summer school, 8-13 June 2020. This week-long event is open to post-graduate research students and early career academics from any discipline, based anywhere in the world, who are working at the intersection of law and the humanities. Whilst at HKU participants will take two intensive seminar series led by Alison Young, Francine V. McNiff Professor of Criminology at the University of Melbourne and James Martel, Professor of Political Science at San Francisco State University. In addition, there will be sessions on interdisciplinary methodologies, research and writing skills, as well as cultural and social events. This is a fantastic opportunity to work with two of the world’s leading law and humanities scholars, to develop your research and writing skills, expand your knowledge and learn from your peers in the global community of law and humanities researchers.

James Martel: How the law can undo what the law does

This course will consider the notion of law when it is not merely understood in its black letter, rationalist sense. The opposite of such a form of law is not necessarily chaos or nihilism but can have its own creative, contingent and positive forms. Thinking about law in this other, anarchist and decentralized sense allows us to imagine what is common to all forms of law even laws that serve to upend and contest the law as it is usually considered. In thinking about this kind of law, we will engage with a range of thinkers including Walter Benjamin, Giorgio Agamben and Fred Moten.

Alison Young: Imagining Justice in the City

Increasing urbanization means that more and more people live and work in urban centres, and increasing urban populations present particular challenges for social organisation and urban planning, but also for law: how do we imagine a just city in times of increasing population density and social inequality? In this course, we will examine a range of ways of thinking about justice in the city, including concepts of affect, urban encounters, the precariat, ambience and atmosphere, and the lawscape, drawing on the work of Ananya Roy, Sarah Keenan, Ben Anderson, Andreas Phillippopoulos-Mihailopoulos, Guy Standing, Peter Adey and others. A range of case studies will be utilised, including debates around urban aesthetics (and how they are regulated by law); how law responds to visible precarity; and the relationship between city and citizenship.

To apply for the summer school, please click here. Please note there are a number of generous bursaries available to support travel and accommodation costs. For further information about the summer school, including details about accommodation, fees and bursaries please visit our website:

https://www.law.hku.hk/lawandhumanities/summerschool/

For inquiries, please contact Dr Daniel Matthews (HKU, Law): danmat@hku.hk

 

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Posted in Conferences, Giorgio Agamben, Uncategorized, urban/urbanisation, Walter Benjamin | Leave a comment

A Revolutionary from the OECD – the Castoriadis/Poulantzas debate, translated and introduced at the Verso blog

A Revolutionary from the OECD – the Castoriadis/Poulantzas debate – at the Verso blog

In 1977, an intense debate raged in the Greek press between Nicos Poulantzas and Cornelius Castoriadis, sparked by remarks made by Poulantzas in an article that questioned Castoriadis political commitment to ending the dictatorship in Greece, and his position as a high-level economist for the OECD. Here, published in English for the first time, is the record of the debate – published with an introduction by Dimitris Psarras and Dimitris Karidas.

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Martin Heidegger, The Question Concerning the Thing, Rowman & Littlefield, 2018 – reviewed at NDPR

5b3b11a5f5ba7414c0ee8dc5.jpgMartin Heidegger, The Question Concerning the Thing, Rowman & Littlefield, 2018 – also reviewed at NDPR by Hakhamanesh Zangeneh.

This is a new translation of material which had appeared in English in 1967 but had long been out of print. Insofar as it increases the availability in English of Heidegger’s interpretations of Kant, it is quite welcome. The book is also a welcome return of Heidegger translations to manuscripts dealing with traditional philosophical authors and themes. It can be argued that ever since the publication of Peter Trawny’s reading of the ‘black notebooks,’ in 2014, Heidegger studies has been taken hostage by Nazism studies. The majority of recent English translations released by the biggest publisher of Heidegger’s works, Indiana University Press, have in fact been those diaries. The volume under review contrasts with those books in that it contains no biographical content and stays focused on a major text from the history of Western philosophy. To those hunting for the proverbial “gotcha” passages in this text, this reviewer would counsel “move along, nothing to see.”

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John Sallis, Elemental Discourses, Indiana University Press, 2018 – first volume of Collected Writings, reviewed at NDPR

9780253037244_med.jpgJohn Sallis, Elemental Discourses, Indiana University Press, 2018 – reviewed by Jeffrey Powell at NDPR

The publication of this book is an event for those familiar with the work of John Sallis, for it is the first volume to be published by Indiana University Press in the forty-three volume series The Collected Writings of John Sallis. It is volume four of Part II of The Collected Writings and contains eight chapters of previously unpublished lectures and talks, as well as two previously published essays. The latter two are chapter 6, “Alterity and the Elemental,” which was originally published as “Levinas and the Elemental” in 1998 in Research in Phenomenology; and chapter 8, “The Scope of Visibility,” originally published as “The Extent of Visibility” in the collection Phenomenology and the Metaphysics of Sight. The Collected Writings will consist of three parts: Part I will be Sallis’s originally published monographs; Part II will be previously published papers, lectures, and talks that will be gathered together according to five different themes; and Part III will be lecture courses delivered over the course of Sallis’s career that are either figure or topic specific.

Details of the series are here – forty-three volumes!

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Books received – Adorno et. al., Miller, Dumézil, Althusser

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Ethan Miller, Reimagining Livelihoods: Life Beyond Economy, Society and Environment was sent by the press, The Authoritarian Personality has recently been reissued by Verso and is currently on sale, the rest were bought second-hand.

Posted in Georges Dumézil, Louis Althusser, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Bradley Garrett, ‘Prepping for the apocalypse: bunkers, bullets and billionaires’, ABC radio

Bradley Garrett, ”Prepping for the apocalypse: bunkers, bullets and billionaires‘, ABC radio

Doomsday Prepping, or equipping oneself to survive an imminent apocalypse, has morphed from the activity of a small sub-culture to become a multi-billion dollar industry.

For some Americans, investing in a modest, subterranean bunker with a blast door, has become a feasible alternative to a holiday home.

Meanwhile, Silicon Valley’s super-rich have been building extravagant doomsday bunkers in remote parts of New Zealand, complete with underground cinemas, pools, cryogenic facilities and helipads.

Dr Bradley Garrett is an urban geographer, interested in how we inhabit the spaces we build, and what that says about society on the whole.

He’s also an urban explorer, accomplished at breaking into abandoned, subterranean spaces such as underground tunnels and disused Cold War bunkers.

Brad’s current research project on ‘prepping’, undertaken for the University of Sydney, has seen him visit the sites of new and re-purposed bunker developments around the world, talking with wealthy developers, devout Mormons, and ‘mom and pop’ investors.

He says the notion of planning for a future threat is not entirely irrational. He also has plans for a bunker of his own.

Thanks to dmf for this link.

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Kathryn Medien, ‘Foucault in Tunisia: The encounter with intolerable power’, The Sociological Review 2019

Kathryn Medien, ‘Foucault in Tunisia: The encounter with intolerable power‘, The Sociological Review, 2019, https://doi.org/10.1177/0038026119870107 (requires subscription)

In September 1966, 10 years after Tunisia officially gained independence from French colonial rule, Michel Foucault took up a three-year secondment, teaching philosophy at the University of Tunis. This article offers an account of the time that Foucault spent in Tunisia, documenting his involvement in the anti-imperial, anti-authoritarian struggles that were taking place, and detailing his organizing against the carceral Tunisian state. Through this account, it is argued that Foucault’s entrance into political activism, and his associated work in developing a new analytic of power, was fundamentally motivated by his encounter with the neocolonial operatives of power that he witnessed and resisted while in Tunisia. In tracing the anti-colonial and anti-imperial struggles taking place concurrent to Foucault’s development of his analytic of power, albeit struggles that are shown to not take centre stage in his subsequent works, this article concludes by suggesting that taking seriously the scholar-activist archive presented may offer us a set of radical Foucauldian tools for resistance.

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Free download of Henri Lefebvre, Metaphilosophy, Verso until September 7, 2019

Free download link expires Saturday morning, UK time.

Progressive Geographies

Meta-Philosophy.jpgDownload Metaphilosophy by Henri Lefebvre – for free! – until Saturday, September 7th!

Until September 7th, we’re giving away the ebook edition of Henri Lefebvre’s Metaphilosophy. An essential book on our Philosophy: Verso Student Reading list, and a key text in Lefebvre’s oeuvre, Metaphilosophy is a milestone in contemporary thinking about philosophy’s relation to the world.

Ends Saturday, September 7th at 10.00 BST – if you have clicked through to this page after that time then you have missed this free ebook download.

Metaphilosophy
by Henri Lefebvre Edited by Stuart Elden Translated by David Fernbach

In Metaphilosophy, Henri Lefebvre works through the implications of Marx’s revolutionary thought to consider philosophy’s engagement with the world. Lefebvre takes Marx’s notion of the “world becoming philosophical and philosophy becoming worldly” as a leitmotif, examining the relation between Hegelian–Marxist supersession and Nietzschean overcoming. Metaphilosophy is conceived of as a transformation of philosophy, developing it into a programme…

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‘Migration, Affect and Political Space’: An International Political Sociology and Geography Seminar, Goldsmiths College London, 9 October 2019

‘Migration, Affect and Political Space’: An International Political Sociology and Geography Seminar, Goldsmiths College London, 9 October 2019

Organised by Dr Martina Tazzioli (Goldsmiths College, London) and Dr Angharad Closs Stephens (Swansea University).

Against a backdrop of heightened attention to borders and those who cross them, as well as to the emotions, moods and gestures of political life, this seminar seeks to address the politics of migration and affect together. It arises from our suspicion that current practices of governance––of sorting, categorising, counting and expelling lives, need to be addressed alongside questions about the politics of knowledge and the poetics of style. This seminar will bring together debates, contributions and methodological approaches in International Political Sociology and Geography and explore different ways of addressing questions about affect (as the capacity to move and be moved, as well as ways of orienting ourselves in the world) together with migration (addressing movement, boundaries, mobilization, crossings and borders).

In mobilizing affect and migration as analytical lenses, we are interested in developing other entry points for responding to ‘populist’ times – of heightened racism, far-right nationalism, the fortification of borders and the purification of ideas about identity and citizenship: how we might respond to these urgent times beyond a language of catastrophe and without reproducing some of the sovereign terms, categories and dreams that are currently being energized? How, in taking affect and migration as opening provocations, might we uncover alternative entry points to thinking political space, collective movements and ways of writing about politics? Given the limits of returning to organize around the categories of ‘the people’, ‘class’, and ‘identity’, what other understandings of collective formations, political movements and political space might we develop?

Speakers:

Claudia Aradau, Angharad Closs Stephens, Jason Dittmer, Jef Huysmans, Debbie Lisle, Rahul Rao, Martina Tazzioli

Chairs: Brenna Bhandar; David Brenner; Sanjay Seth

Spaces are limited. To register, please follow this link:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/migration-affect-and-political-space-an-international-political-sociology-and-geography-seminar-tickets-71642186709

This event is primarily aimed at PhD candidates and early career scholars but all are welcome.

If you register then later find you are unable to attend, we kindly ask that you let us know so that we may give your place to someone else. Contact: Dr Angharad Closs Stephens (a.c.stephens@swansea.ac.uk) and Dr Martina Tazzioli (martina.tazzioli@gold.ac.uk).

This event is being funded by the Centre for Postcolonial Studies (Goldsmiths College); Political Economy Research Centre (Goldsmiths College); Doing IPS Research Hub; and the London Interdisciplinary Social Science Doctoral Training Partnership.
Posted in Conferences, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Free download of Henri Lefebvre, Metaphilosophy, Verso until September 7, 2019

Meta-Philosophy.jpgDownload Metaphilosophy by Henri Lefebvre – for free! – until Saturday, September 7th!

Until September 7th, we’re giving away the ebook edition of Henri Lefebvre’s Metaphilosophy. An essential book on our Philosophy: Verso Student Reading list, and a key text in Lefebvre’s oeuvre, Metaphilosophy is a milestone in contemporary thinking about philosophy’s relation to the world.

Ends Saturday, September 7th at 10.00 BST – if you have clicked through to this page after that time then you have missed this free ebook download.

Metaphilosophy
by Henri Lefebvre Edited by Stuart Elden Translated by David Fernbach

 

In Metaphilosophy, Henri Lefebvre works through the implications of Marx’s revolutionary thought to consider philosophy’s engagement with the world. Lefebvre takes Marx’s notion of the “world becoming philosophical and philosophy becoming worldly” as a leitmotif, examining the relation between Hegelian–Marxist supersession and Nietzschean overcoming. Metaphilosophy is conceived of as a transformation of philosophy, developing it into a programme of radical worldwide change. The book demonstrates Lefebvre’s threefold debt to Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche, but it also brings a number of other figures into the conversation, including Sartre, Heidegger and Axelos. A key text in Lefebvre’s oeuvre, Metaphilosophy is also a milestone in contemporary thinking about philosophy’s relation to the world.

Reviews

Metaphilosophy establishes Lefebvre’s place among the twentieth century’s very greatest Marxist thinkers. Arguing that the idea of philosophy can only be realized by going beyond philosophy itself, Lefebvre opens philosophy up to the concerns of everyday life and love, mass media and synthetics, consumerism and nuclear apocalypse, in a breathtakingly original vision of what truly radical thought might be. First written in French half a century ago, the remarkable challenges that it poses remain as significant as ever. There will not be a more important work of philosophy published this decade.”

Posted in Henri Lefebvre, Uncategorized | 2 Comments