A roundup of posts on time management etc.

And following that last post, a bit of a round-up of a number of posts by others on time management etc. While some of the things here are not for everyone, part of the overall motivation is to help to prioritise, to create time and space to do what is important to you, and to breathe a bit, rather than rush ‘to be productive’ or to ‘achieve more’.

Jo VanEvery has some good posts – on keeping a ‘done’ list alongside a ‘to do’ one, and balancing writing and student demands.

For longer projects, see her post on how to plan a research semester with a book under contract; or Karen Kelsky on ‘My Top Five Tips for Turning Your Dissertation Into a Book‘.

On the mechanics of doing research, Raul Pacheco-Vega is good. See, for example ‘taking notes effectively‘, ‘Processing a paper protocol‘ and ‘Starting up and maintaining an Everything Notebook‘. Also see his ‘On slow scholarship, time investments and good research‘; and ‘Strategies to sustain your research during heavy-teaching semesters‘. It was also his blog that led me to this older post on making a weekly template.

And finally, yet another one on email – Don’t Let Email Zombies Eat Up Your Day

 

There are lots more posts and links about writing and publishing here.

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The Slow Professor movement: reclaiming the intellectual life of the university

9781487521851The Slow Professor movement: reclaiming the intellectual life of the university – radio interview with Maggie Berg and Barbara K. Seeber on The Sunday Edition. More on the book here.

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Some related links –

How many hours a week should academics work? – Times Higher Education

The challenge of writing in the accelerated academy – The Sociological Imagination

The Daily Routines of Famous Creative People – Podio

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Cite Specific: Analyzing Endnotes to Teach Historical Methods

Cite Specific: Analyzing Endnotes to Teach Historical Methods – an interesting exercise by Roxanne Panchasi.

It all started with a desire to have a different kind of conversation with my students about citation, one that wouldn’t be consumed by the details of formatting or the penalties for plagiarism. These are important things, of course, and I try to address them in every syllabus and assignment outline that I put together. You know the section I mean: the clear statement of expectations, the links to resources and policies online, the striking of that balance between helpful guidance and stern warning. But you’ve probably also experienced that section’s shortcomings—or at least wondered if anyone was paying attention as you explained it—when unattributed information showed up in final papers. To provide an alternative that actually works, I’ve developed an in-class exercise called “Xtreme Endnotes,” which I use at the beginning of every historical methods course that I teach.
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A ‘geographically accurate tube and rail map’ of London

map_crossrail.pngWhile the standard TFL map is a model of a functional map – all straight-lines and angles – it can sometimes mean that people take journeys that would actually be faster above ground.

So, someone asked TFL for a ‘geographically accurate tube and rail map‘ of London, and this is what they got. Click through for the full thing [pdf], but the part above of central London gives a good idea. It shows the as yet-unopened Crossrail (Elizabeth line) in dotted purple, and the Northern line spur to Nine Elms and Battersea (dotted black).

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The Challenges of Research Assessment – report on the REF 2014

The Challenges of Research Assessment‘ – report on the REF 2014. News report in the THE here.

 

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Livestreaming on boundary2.org: Neoliberalism, Its Ontology and Genealogy: The Work and Context of Philip Mirowski

boundary 2 will livestream its spring conference, Neoliberalism, Its Ontology and Genealogy: The Work and Context of Philip Mirowski on March 17 and March 18, 2017.

The livestream will appear here, where you can also find the conference schedule.

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Tragedy and Philosophy – Dennis Schmidt interviewed by Richard Marshall

Tragedy and Philosophy – Dennis Schmidt interviewed by Richard Marshall at 3am Magazine

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‘This video ultimately explains why all world maps are wrong’

Projecting a round surface of the Earth on a flat surface is not an easy task. Scientists are trying to find an optimal way to do it for centuries. In fact the most common map projection that we use almost everyday in Google Maps and other mapping services, has been introduced in 1569 by Gerardus Mercator.

Guys from Vox decided to give it a shot and tried to explain the complexity of map projections in a simple way… And they’ve succeeded. This video will ultimately explain you the concept of projections and why all world maps are in fact wrong.

 

Update: this is also worth a look – The True Size

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Architecture’s Environmental Complex: A Review of Felicity Scott’s Outlaw Territories

Ross Exo Adams reviews Felicity Scott’s Outlaw Territories

MACHINES OF URBANIZATION

Pre-Publication draft; forthcoming in The Journal of Architecture, Vol 22, No. 2 (March 2017)

Felicity Scott, Outlaw Territories: Environments of Insecurity/Architectures of Counterinsurgency, 560 pages, 104 illustrations, Zone Books, 2016, New York City, ISBN: 1935408739, $39.95 (hardcover).


Reflecting on music culture, the late Mark Fisher spoke of what he called a ‘temporal malaise’ that had beset contemporary society, a term that describes a growing sense that the future, as a category, has disappeared. Late neoliberal, communicative capitalism, he argues, has colonised life in its phenomenological dimensions, an effect of which is to slowly cancel the possibility of perceiving a future. We’re trapped, he claims, in the 20th century; our 21st century cultural experience looks a lot like ‘20th century culture on higher definition screens’.[i]

Reading Felicity Scott’s Outlaw Territories: Environments of Insecurity/Architectures of Counterinsurgency may reaffirm such a claim. Indeed, what is striking about the histories Scott recounts are the…

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Professor of Political Theory post at University of Warwick

Professor of Political Theory post at University of Warwick – details here.

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