Category Archives: Hannah Arendt

Books received – Hill, Barthes, King, Chamayou, Keltner, Clark & Szerszynski, Nail

Some books in recompense for review work for Polity, Thomas Nail’s Theory of the Earth, sent by Stanford, and Samantha Rose Hill’s Hannah Arendt.

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Hannah Arendt papers at the Library of Congress online

The extensive collection of Hannah Arendt’s papers held at the Library of Congress are available online. The papers of author, educator, political philosopher, and public intellectual Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) constitute a large and diverse collection (25,000 items; 82,597 images) reflecting … Continue reading

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Samantha Rose Hill Reconsiders Hannah Arendt’s Thoughts on Hope, a Year into COVID-19 ‹ Literary Hub

Hosted by Paul Holdengräber, The Quarantine Tapes chronicles shifting paradigms in the age of social distancing. Each day, Paul calls a guest for a brief discussion about how they are experiencing the global pandemic. On Episode 171 of The Quarantine Tapes, Paul Holdengräber … Continue reading

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Jessica Dubow, In Exile: Philosophy, Geography and Judaic Thought – Bloomsbury, November 2020

Jessica Dubow, In Exile: Philosophy, Geography and Judaic Thought – Bloomsbury, November 2020 In In Exile, Jessica Dubow situates exile in a new context in which it holds both critical capacity and political potential. She not only outlines the origin of … Continue reading

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Samantha Rose Hill, Hannah Arendt and the politics of truth – Open Democracy; and details of her book on Arendt – Reaktion, May 2021

Samantha Rose Hill, Hannah Arendt and the politics of truth – Open Democracy Her book Hannah Arendt is forthcoming with Reaktion in 2021 Hannah Arendt is one of the most renowned political thinkers of the twentieth century and her work … Continue reading

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Books received – Kristeva, Lévi-Strauss, Huffer, Palti, Löwith, Barthes, Stanek

Some books in recompense for review work from Columbia University Press, and a copy of Łukasz Stanek, Architecture in Global Socialism: Eastern Europe, West Africa and the Middle East in the Cold War, sent by the publisher.

Posted in Claude Lévi-Strauss, Hannah Arendt, Julia Kristeva, Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes | 1 Comment

Video and audio recordings of Hannah Arendt

Samantha Rose Hill (@Samantharhill) shared these on Twitter – a really useful resource. UpdateL there is some useful discussion at Aphelis Recordings of Hannah Arendt: with Joachim Fest https://t.co/3sOLQtVzPC On Heidegger https://t.co/3myge0R7ZP On Brecht https://t.co/r7iHPVO0Pa On Power & Violence https://t.co/b3MPsHPUQkContinue reading

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Samantha Rose Hill, Where to start with Hannah Arendt’s work

People often ask me where they should start with Hannah Arendt's work. These are my most common suggestions. For those who want a taste before committing to the longer works: Politics: CrisesTheory: Between Past & FutureA sense of Arendt: Men … Continue reading

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In search of an Arendt (mis)quotation

Hannah Arendt’s work, especially The Origins of Totalitarianism, has been back in the news the last few years for obvious reasons. One quotation in particular seems to be especially pertinent. It reads: “One of the greatest advantages of the totalitarian elites … Continue reading

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Hannah Arendt and Theodor W. Adorno’s correspondence on the legacy of Walter Benjamin

Hannah Arendt and Theodor W. Adorno’s correspondence on the legacy of Walter Benjamin – in the Los Angeles Review of Books, edited and translated by Susan H. Gillespie and Samantha Rose Hill THE 1967 CORRESPONDENCE between Hannah Arendt and Theodor … Continue reading

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