Klaus Dodds, Border Wars: The Conflicts that will Define our Future – Ebury Press, February 2021

Klaus Dodds, Border Wars: The Conflicts that will Define our Future – Ebury Press, February 2021

Can Donald Trump really build that wall? What does Brexit mean for Ireland’s border? And what would happen if Elon Musk declared himself president of the Moon?

In Border Wars, Professor Klaus Dodds takes us on a journey into the geopolitical conflict of tomorrow in an eye-opening tour of the world’s best-known, most dangerous and most unexpected border conflicts from the Gaza Strip to the space race. 

Along the way, we’ll discover just what border truly mean in the modern world: how are they built; what do they mean for citizens and governments; how do they help understand our political past and, most importantly, our diplomatic future?

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Patricia Owens and Katharina Rietzler (eds.), Women’s International Thought: A New History – Cambridge University Press, 2021 and book launch in Sussex

Patricia Owens and Katharina Rietzler (eds.), Women’s International Thought: A New History – Cambridge University Press, 2021

Women’s International Thought: A New History is the first cross-disciplinary history of women’s international thought. Bringing together some of the foremost historians and scholars of international relations working today, this book recovers and analyses the path-breaking work of eighteen leading thinkers of international politics from the early to mid-twentieth century. Recovering and analyzing this important work, the essays offer revisionist accounts of IR’s intellectual and disciplinary history and expand the locations, genres, and practices of international thinking. Systematically structured, and focusing in particular on Black diasporic, Anglo-American, and European historical women, it does more than ‘add women’ to the existing intellectual and disciplinary histories from which they were erased. Instead, it raises fundamental questions about which kinds of subjects and what kind of thinking constitutes international thought, opening new vistas to scholars and students of international history and theory, intellectual history and women’s and gender studies.

Recovers and analyzes the important work of Black diasporic, Anglo-American, and European historical women who are missing from existing histories of international thought

Systematically analyses the work of eighteen leading thinkers of international politics in the early and mid-twentieth century

Opens new vistas to scholars and students of international history and theory, intellectual history and women’s and gender studies, and provides a framework for future research

‘A breath-taking eye-opener of a book and required reading for everyone studying international relations and the history of political thought. With cutting-edge scholarship … it reveals new horizons of internationalism, socialism, and solidarity. It unveils fierce critiques of the nation-state and imperialism, centres race and gender as topics within international thought, and reveals the ways in which the politics of race and gender have shaped the field. This book reshapes the field beautifully.’ Hannah Dawson, King’s College London

‘This defies all conventions, categories, and canons to bring new, nuanced histories of women, intellectualism, and internationalism into view. With essays on socialist internationalist theory, war and empire, and global black liberation, these authors show that no study of internationalism – institutional or otherwise – can be complete without rigorous examination of women theorists.’ Ashley D. Farmer, University of Texas, Austin

‘This points the way to a renovation of our canon in a field first named by a woman in 1929. Portending a new historiography, the results so far correct, encourage, and reprimand all those who have tried to write the history of antiracism, human rights, and peace, among so many other international causes and frameworks.’ Samuel Moyn, Yale University

‘By recovering the international thought and practice of a diverse group of brilliant and dedicated women scholars and activists, this essential volume rewrites the history of the field. Often working under duress and at the edges of the academy, these thinkers nonetheless shaped understandings of – and galvanized engagement with – the pressing global problems of their times. We have much to learn from their work, and from their example.’ Susan Pedersen, Columbia University

‘This remarkable collection upends the unspoken consensus of virtually all of those who write about the foundational thinkers and ideas about international relations: that women never mattered.’ Robert Vitalis, University of Pennsylvania

There is a book launch for Women’s International Thought: A New History (CUP, 2021), hosted by the Sussex Centre for Intellectual History on 11 February 2021 – details here.

Speakers include Duncan Bell (Cambridge), Synne Dyvik (Sussex) and Matthew Specter (Berkeley). Chaired by Joanne Paul (Sussex). Join us for a zoom discussion of the book and a live Q&A with the editors.

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Daniele Lorenzini on Foucault and Descartes (open access) – part of Theory, Culture & Society Special Issue: ‘Foucault Before the Collège de France’

Daniele Lorenzini’s article “Philosophical Discourse and Ascetic Practice: On Foucault’s Readings of Descartes’ Meditations” is now available open access. The article is part of a Theory, Culture & Society Special Issue: ‘Foucault Before the Collège de France’ which I’m co-editing with Daniele and Orazio Irrera.

The other papers so far available are listed here, along with two video abstracts. My article is open access too; the others require subscription.

Posted in Michel Foucault, René Descartes | 2 Comments

Books received – Paine, Du Bois, Lévi-Strauss, Hyppolite, Martinet, de Saussure, Ewald, Della Dora

Paine and Du Bois are for teaching, the others relate to the ongoing Foucault work, along with a long-awaited copy of Veronica Della Dora’s excellent book The Mantle of the Earth: Genealogies of a Geographical Metaphor, which I read in manuscript.

Posted in Claude Lévi-Strauss, Michel Foucault, The Archaeology of Foucault | 1 Comment

‘From Dynastics to Genealogy’, my contribution to Abolition Democracy 13/13, Beyond the Punitive Society

This piece now reposted at Critical Legal Thinking

Progressive Geographies

On 7 January 2021 I’ll be part of a panel discussion for the Abolition Democracy 13/13 series, hosted by Bernard E. Harcourt at the Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought, and co-organised with Daniele Lorenzini of The Centre for Research in Post-Kantian European Philosophy at Warwick. We will be discussing Foucault’s 1972-73 lecture course The Punitive Society. Before the event, which will be live-streamed, participants have been asked to post a short piece about one or more ideas in the course. I’ve written a piece entitled ‘From Dynastics to Genealogy‘, which is a synopsis of a longer piece in progress.

It can be read here, and the other contributions from Goldie Osuri, Daniele Lorenzini, Bernard Harcourt, Rahsaan Thomas and others here. That last link has all the details of how to follow the discussion.

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Corine Pelluchon, Les Lumières à l’âge du vivant – Seuil, January 2021

Corine Pelluchon, Les Lumières à l’âge du vivant – Seuil, January 2021

Comment défendre les Lumières aujourd’hui ? Leur idéal d’émancipation a-t-il encore un sens ?

On ne saurait se borner à invoquer un esprit des Lumières immuable dans un contexte marqué par le réveil du nationalisme, les crises environnementales et sanitaires et l’augmentation des inégalités. Faire face au danger d’effondrement de notre civilisation sans renoncer à la rationalité philosophico-scientifique, mais en tenant compte de notre dépendance à l’égard de la nature et des autres vivants : telle est la démarche qui fonde ce livre. Pour combattre les anti-Lumières qui souhaitent rétablir une société hiérarchique ou théocratique et répondre aux accusations des postmodernes qui suspectent tout universalisme d’être hégémonique, il faut donc proposer de nouvelles Lumières. Celles-ci supposent de revisiter l’histoire des Lumières, mais aussi de lutter contre l’amputation de la raison qui a été réduite à un instrument de calcul et d’exploitation.

L’objectif des Lumières à l’âge du vivant et de leur projet d’une société démocratique et écologique est bien de destituer le principe de la domination – une domination des autres et de la nature à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur de soi qui traduit un mépris du corps et de la vulnérabilité. 

Corine Pelluchon est philosophe et professeur à l’université Gustave-Eiffel. Elle a publié une dizaine d’ouvrages, parmi lesquels Les Nourritures. Philosophie du corps politique (Seuil, 2015, Points, 2020), Éthique de la considération (Seuil, 2018) et Pour comprendre Levinas (Seuil, 2020). Son œuvre a été récompensé en 2020 par le prix de la pensée critique Günther Anders.

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Stephen Connelly, Leibniz: A Contribution to the Archaeology of Power – Edinburgh University Press, March 2021

Stephen Connelly, Leibniz: A Contribution to the Archaeology of Power – Edinburgh University Press, March 2021

A critical reading of Leibniz’s legal theory, linking law, space and power 

Contributes to an archaeology of power

Investigates the deep link between law, space and power

Provides an overview of key concepts from Scholastic thought which are difficult to find in English

The concept of power has been a major feature of natural law theories. It evolved over the course of several centuries and was arguably the defining notion in both Hobbes’ and Spinoza’s doctrines of natural right. Yet Leibniz appears to effect a reversal in this millennium-long trajectory and demotes power to a derivative term of his philosophy. 

What was the rationale behind this radical change? And what does this reversal mean for the philosophy that follows?

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Power and Time: Temporalities in Conflict and the Making of History, edited by Dan Edelstein, Stefanos Geroulanos and Natasha Wheatley – University of Chicago Press, December 2020

Now published

Progressive Geographies

9780226481623Power and Time: Temporalities in Conflict and the Making of History, edited by Dan Edelstein, Stefanos Geroulanos and Natasha Wheatley – University of Chicago Press, December 2020

Time is the backdrop of historical inquiry, yet it is much more than a featureless setting for events. Different temporalities interact dynamically; sometimes they coexist tensely, sometimes they clash violently. In this innovative volume, editors Dan Edelstein, Stefanos Geroulanos, and Natasha Wheatley bring together essays that challenge how we interpret history by focusing on the nexus of two concepts— “power” and “time”—as they manifest in a wide variety of case studies. Analyzing history, culture, politics, technology, law, art, and science, this engaging book shows how “temporal regimes” are constituted through the shaping of power in historically specific ways. Power and Time includes seventeen essays on a wide variety of subjects: human rights; sovereignty; Islamic, European, and Indian history; slavery; capitalism; revolution; the…

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Foucault Studies. New series on Foucault’s lectures (2020)

New series of readings of Foucault’s Collège de France lecture course – all open access.

Foucault News

Vol III, No 1: Governmentality, Liberalism, Biopower, Genealogy of the Modern Subject.

Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France 1978-80 Security, Territory and Population; The Birth of Biopolitics; On the Government of the Living.
Volume III of the Foucault Lecture Series.
Published: 2020-12-16

EDITORIAL [extract]
Sverre Raffnsøe, Alain Beaulieu, Barbara Cruikshank, Knut Ove Eliassen, Marius Gudmand-Høyer, Thomas Götselius, Daniele Lorenzini, Hernan Camilo Pulido Martinez, Johanna Oksala, Clare O’Farrell, Rodrigo Castro Orellana, Eva Bendix Petersen, Alan Rosenberg, Dianna Taylor, Signe Macholm Müller & Asker Bryld Staunæs.

The editors of Foucault Studies are pleased to publish this volume of Foucault Lectures containing three articles, each devoted to discussing one of Foucault’s yearly series of lectures at the Collège de France.

In “The Beginning of a Study of Biopower,” Verena Erlenbusch-Anderson (Syracuse University) centers the attention on Foucault’s 1978 lecture course at the Collège de France entitled Security, Territory…

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Hannah Jones, Violent Ignorance : Confronting Racism and Migration Control – Zed/Bloomsbury, January 2021 (and virtual book launch on 28 January 2021)

Hannah Jones, Violent Ignorance : Confronting Racism and Migration Control – Zed/Bloomsbury, January 2021

An elected politician is assassinated in the street by a terrorist associated with extreme political groups, and the national response is to encourage picnics.

Thousands of people are held in prison-like conditions without judicial oversight or any time-limit on their sentence.

An attempt to re-assert national sovereignty and borders leads thousands of citizens to register for dual citizenship with other countries, some overcoming family associations with genocide in their second country of nationality to do so. This is life in the UK today. How then are things still continuing as ‘normal’? How can we confront these phenomena and why do we so often refuse to?

What are the practices that help us to accommodate the unconscionable?

How might we contend with the horrors that meet us each day, rather than becoming desensitized to them?Violent Ignorance sets out to examine these questions through an understanding of how the past persists in the present, how trauma is silenced or reappears, and how we might reimagine identity and connection in ways that counter – rather than ignore – historic violence.

In particular Hannah Jones shows how border controls and enforcement, and its corollary, racism and violence, have shifted over time.

Drawing on thinkers from John Berger to Ben Okri, from Audre Lorde to Susan Sontag, the book questions what it means to belong, and discusses how hierarchies of belonging are revealed by what we can see, and what we can ignore.

There is also a virtual book launch

The launch event will be an in-conversation between Hannah Jones and Shami Chakrabarti, followed by a participant Q+A chaired by Nisha Kapoor. It will take place on Thursday, 28th January, 6pm-7.30pm.

It will be a Zoom event, free and open to all but places are limited – register here https://violentignorance.eventbrite.co.uk

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