Antonio Gramsci, The Prison Notebooks – exhibition in London

Antonio Gramsci, The Prison Notebooks – exhibition in London

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Exhibition curated by Silvio Pons and Francesco Giasi

Italian Cultural Institute
39 Belgrave Square
London SW1X 8NX

30 October – 10 November 2017
Monday to Friday 10am – 6pm
(closed on Wednesday 1 November)

On the occasion of the 80th anniversary of Antonio Gramsci’s death (1891-1937), the Italian Cultural Institute hosts an exhibition featuring the originals of the 33 Prison Notebooks – that is, the texts written by Antonio Gramsci from 8th February 1929 during his imprisonment – one of the most significant works of Italian and international political, philosophical and literary thinking.

The originals of the Notebooks are exhibited for the first time in the United Kingdom and, more generally, out of Italy. This exhibition aims to renew the link between Gramsci’s thought and British culture, inaugurated by the “dialogue” with Ludwig Wittgenstein through Piero Sraffa, Professor at Cambridge in the same years of the Austrian philosopher, and “blown up” after the publication of the Selections from the Prison Notebooks by Lawrence and Wishart, edited and translated by Quintin Hoare and Geoffrey Nowell-Smith (1971).

The Notebooks are accompanied by touch screens featuring their digital edition, thus allowing the visitors to virtually leaf through their pages.

This exhibition will also be the opportunity to take stock of the studies about Gramsci from a global perspective, through a series of lectures and talks which will be announced soon.

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One Response to Antonio Gramsci, The Prison Notebooks – exhibition in London

  1. stuartelden says:

    Reblogged this on Progressive Geographies and commented:

    Just a reminder that this exhibition is on just for one more week. I went today and if you’re in London and have even the slightest interest in Gramsci it’s well worth seeing. It is only the notebooks – no other material and minimal other information. But it is the notebooks! And the materiality of these is worth seeing – the organisation of material, his minuscule and very neat handwriting, and little sense of the conditions under which they were filled. There is also an electronic version which you can use to look through the notebooks – the originals are in glass cases and so are fixed on specific pages or the cover.

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