Books received – Dodds & Nuttall, Osborne, Bataille, Demetriou and Dimova, Fennelly, Magazine littéraire

Books received – Klaus Dodds & Mark Nuttall, The Arctic: What Everyone Needs to Know, Thomas Osborne, The Structure of Modern Cultural Theory, George Bataille, The Unfinished System of Knowledge, Olga Demetriou and Rozita Dimova, The Political Materialities of Borders, Katherine Fennelly, An Archaeology of Lunacy, and back issues of Magazine littéraire with sections on Foucault.

I bought the Magazine littéraire issues, and The Arctic was a gift from Klaus. The rest were recompense for review work.

books

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24 Best New International Relations Books To Read In 2019 from Book Authority

24 Best New International Relations Books To Read In 2019 from Book Authority

Good to see a few more critical takes among the more mainstream works.

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Len Lawlor’s From Violence to Speaking Out: Apocalypse and Expression in Foucault, Derrida and Deleuze reviewed in NDPR

Len Lawlor’s recent book reviewed – details of the book itself here https://edinburghuniversitypress.com/book-from-violence-to-speaking-out.html

PHILOSOPHY IN A TIME OF ERROR

by my colleague Jeff Bell here.

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Bryan Magee (1930-2019) – tribute by Henry Hardy and links to his TV discussions

Bryan Magee (1930-2019) – tribute by Henry Hardy and links to his TV discussions – with Isaiah Berlin, Herbert Marcus, AJ Ayer, Noam Chomsky, Iris Murdoch and many others. Thanks to Jo Wolff for the links.

The Great Philosophers was one of the first books I read which introduced me to Heidegger – transcripts of some of these TV discussions, first published in 1987.

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Agnes Heller (1929-2019) – tribute at Daily Nous

heller-agnes-2-768x453I’m slow to link to the news about Agnes Heller (1929-2019), who died recently. There is a tribute at Daily Nous along with links to obituaries from ReutersHungary TodayDeutsche Welle, Le Monde.

 

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Nadia Bou Ali and Rohit Goel (eds.), Lacan Contra Foucault: Subjectivity, Sex, and Politics, Bloomsbury, 2019 – reviewed at NDPR

9781350036888Nadia Bou Ali and Rohit Goel (eds.), Lacan Contra Foucault: Subjectivity, Sex, and Politics, Bloomsbury, 2019 – reviewed at NDPR. Sounds an interesting, if uneven collection. Shame about the prohibitive price.

This book grew out of a 2015 conference at the American University of Beirut. Its six chapters are technical and require prior familiarity with both Foucault and Lacan. Most of the authors have a background in both philosophy and psychoanalysis, but other disciplines are represented as well. The influence of the Slovenian approach to Lacan is particularly pronounced: at least four of the six contributors have studied or taught at the University of Ljubljana. Despite the title, only half of the chapters bear directly on the complex relationship between Foucault and Lacan. Lacan specialists are heavily represented in this volume, but Foucault scholars are missing.
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Remembering Paul Virilio: New Issue of Cultural Politics July 2019 (requires subscription)

cup_15_2_cover.pngRemembering Paul Virilio: New Issue of Cultural Politics July 2019 (requires subscription)

 

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How We Read: Tales, Fury, Nothing, Sound, edited by Suzanne Conklin Akbari and Kaitlin Heller- Punctum, summer 2019

An excerpt from Irina Dumitrescu is available here – https://longreads.com/2019/07/22/reading-lessons/

Progressive Geographies

how-we-read-cover-20190412How We Read: Tales, Fury, Nothing, Sound, edited by Suzanne Conklin Akbari and Kaitlin Heller- Punctum, summer 2019 – the follow-up to How We Write: Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blank Page

What do we do when we read?

Reading can be an act of consumption or an act of creation. Our “work reading” overlaps with our “pleasure reading,” and yet these two modes of reading engage with different parts of the self. It is sometimes passive, sometimes active, and can even be an embodied form.

The contributors to this volume share their own histories of reading in order to reveal the shared pleasure that lies in this most solitary of acts – which is also, paradoxically, the act of most complete plenitude. Many of the contributors engage in academic writing, and several publish in other genres, including poetry and fiction; some contributors maintain an active online presence…

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Hannah Arendt and Shakespeare, September 7, 2019

The next in this sequence of workshops on Shakespeare in philosophy

Kingston Shakespeare Seminar

David Garrick built his Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames at Hampton in 1755, as a place where ‘the thinkers of the world’ would meet to reflect on the plays. He hoped Voltaire would come. Now the Kingston Shakespeare Seminar is realising the great actor’s vision, with a series of symposia on

Shakespeare in Philosophy

Each of these Saturday events features talks by leading philosophers and Shakespeare scholars, coffee and tea in the riverside garden designed by Capability Brown, and lunch at the historic Bell Inn.

Arendt and Shakespeare

On Saturday September 7 2019 the Temple symposium will be on

HANNAH ARENDT AND SHAKESPEARE

with contributions from

Richard Burt, Howard Caygill, Paul Kottman,

Caroline Lion, Avraham Oz, Björn Quiring, Cecilia Sjöholm

To register for the event go to

https://arendtandshakespeare.eventbrite.co.uk

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Call for Papers for the Second Annual Conference: Capitalism, Social Science and the Platform University

Call for papers – Second Annual Conference: Capitalism, Social Science and the Platform University

Culture, Politics and Global Justice

28 – 29 November 2019
Lancaster University

Higher education is increasingly ‘platformised’. Indeed, digital platforms have become ubiquitous. They are dominant intermediaries not only in our social, economic and political life, but have become central forms of capitalist accumulation. While platforms differ in terms of openness to developers and public access to data, they operate on similar principles. Some have grown to the extent that have become infrastructures in their own right such as Facebook, while others ‘plug-in’ and become parts of the digital infrastructural backbone. The technical and business aspects of platforms are two sides of the same coin – the market-making aspect of platforms is thus driving technological development, and the technical aspect is configuring markets. These processes, as well as their fast growth and complexity, pose methodological challenges including even identifying appropriate units of analysis.

Higher education is increasingly subject to platformization processes. Yet, in the growing…

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