Thanos Zartaloudis, The Birth of Nomos – Edinburgh University Press, November 2018

9781474442008Thanos Zartaloudis, The Birth of Nomos – Edinburgh University Press, 2018

Unfortunately only in an expensive hardback at present, but this looks a major study.

Delves into the history of the ancient Greek word nomos (and related words) to reveal the interdisciplinary depth of this term beyond its later meaning of ‘law’ or ‘law-making’
This is a highly original, interdisciplinary study of the archaic Greek word nomos and its family of words. Thanos Zartaloudis draws out the richness of this fundamental term by exploring its many uses over the centuries.

The Birth of Nomos includes extracts from a wide range of ancient sources, in both the original and English translation, including material from legal history, philosophy, philology, linguistics, ancient history, poetry, archaeology, ancient musicology and anthropology. Through a thorough analysis of these extracts, we gain a new understanding of nomos and its foundational place in the Western legal tradition.

Key Features

Assembles a genealogical history of the ancient Greek work nomos, showing how it contains a richness that is not reflected in its classical and modern usage as simply ‘law’ or ‘law-making’

Draws on works by ancient Greek philosophers, poets and tragedians including Homer, Hesiod, Alcman, Pindar, Archilochos, Theognis, Heraclitus, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Plato

Includes extracts from ancient primary sources, in both the original and in English translation, to analyse how nomos has been used in the literary evidence and in context

Considers how nomos has been used by contemporary philosophers, including Agamben, Foucault, Heidegger, Schmitt, Deleuze and Axelos, and re-examines their interpretations

 

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2 Responses to Thanos Zartaloudis, The Birth of Nomos – Edinburgh University Press, November 2018

  1. Pingback: The Birth of Nomos, Thanos Zartaloudis (2018) – Philosophy of Movement

  2. Philip says:

    About time. Hopefully we can now stop citing Schmitt as though he were a historian.

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