The work of editing – adding references to translations II

In a previous post I said a bit about one of the tasks of editing a translation. I’ve now completed the Heidegger references I discussed in that previous post. The references to Hegel, Jaspers, Heraclitus, Homer, Lukács and Lenin took relatively little time – they were either references to whole works or used standard numbering for the Greeks. The unreferenced Kant passage was surprisingly easy to locate. There were only a few to Nietzsche, but they took a bit of work – old editions of Nietzsche’s notes are notoriously difficult to match up with new editions, but I found the relevant passages in the Kritische Studienausgabe. As far as I’m aware these passages are not translated in any English collection.

Marx was more of a challenge. There were a few passages from Capital, the dissertation, the 1857 introduction to the Contribution to the Critique of Political EconomyThe Poverty of Philosophy; several to The German Ideology and over twenty to the 1844 Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts. The order of the edition used of the latter is clearly different to the English Penguin/NLR version, so that took quite a bit of time. With a few exceptions – about five things to be checked in a library – I think the notes are done. Now to the introduction.

desk 2

This entry was posted in Friedrich Nietzsche, Georg Lukács, Karl Jaspers, Karl Marx, Martin Heidegger, Publishing. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The work of editing – adding references to translations II

  1. Pingback: Kostas Axelos, On Marx and Heidegger – forthcoming with Meson Press, translated by Kenneth Mills and edited by Stuart Elden | Progressive Geographies

  2. Pingback: Editing Henri Lefebvre’s Metaphilosophy – doing his endnotes properly | Progressive Geographies

  3. Pingback: “I have endeavoured to tidy up Sartre’s haphazard references…” | Progressive Geographies

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