Life in the Accelerated Academy: anxiety thrives, demands intensify and metrics hold the tangled web together

Interesting piece at the Impact of Social Sciences blog by Mark Carrigan.

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The imagined slowness of university life has given way to a frenetic pace, defined by a perpetual ratcheting up of demands and an entrepreneurial ethos seeking new and quantifiable opportunities. Mark Carrigan explores the toxic elements of this culture and its underlying structural roots. As things get faster, we tend to accept things as they are rather than imagining how they might be. But the very speed of social media may act as a short-circuit. The limited investment necessary means that social media can allow the imagination to thrive. 

When questioned by a friend in 1980 as to whether he was happy at Princeton, the philosopher Richard Rorty replied that he was “delighted that I lucked into a university which pays me to make up stories and tell them”. He went on to suggest that “Universities permit one to read books and report what one thinks about them, and get paid for it” and that this is why he saw himself first and foremost as a writer, in spite of his already entrenched antipathy towards the philosophical profession which would grow with time. It’s a lovely idea, isn’t it? This is the thought that keeps coming back to me as I’m preparing to participate in the Time Without Time symposium in Edinburgh later this week… [continues]

This is an edited extract of a three part reflection (Part 1Part 2Part 3) which first appeared on the author’s personal blog.

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2 Responses to Life in the Accelerated Academy: anxiety thrives, demands intensify and metrics hold the tangled web together

  1. Pingback: Top posts this week on Progressive Geographies | Progressive Geographies

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