CFP: Urban Planning and the Spatial Ideas of Henri Lefebvre

Details of a theme issue devoted to Lefebvre’s work. Do check the journal’s open access policy and article processing charges (see also here).

CFP: Urban Planning and the Spatial Ideas of Henri LefebvreEditor: Michael Leary-Owhin (London South Bank University, UK)

Deadline for Full Papers: 15 January 2018 Issue Release: June 2018

This themed issue of Urban Planning seeks to contribute to and extend the debate regarding the application of Lefebvre’s ideas to the current challenges and opportunities of urban planning. Papers can cover a range of issues e.g.: governance, urban design, urban regeneration, environmental management, community participation, housing, policy making and evaluation, local/strategic planning, infrastructure, international planning, neoliberal urbanism, smart cities, land hunger, urbanisation, gentrification, urban poverty/inequality, the right to the city, new towns/cities, planning history, city management and the law.

We welcome papers that present: new empirical research, critical reviews of current issues, theoretical discussions and developments and demonstrate a critical engagement with Lefebvre’s ideas and arguments.

Urban planning has an intense concern with ‘urban space’ (including ‘rural space’). Spatial planning evolved as a concept in attempts to integrate the complex social, economic, environmental and political aspects of late 20th century society. Similarly, the spatial ideas of the (neo)Marxist philosopher/sociologist Henri Lefebvre encompass these issues but also stress the importance of culture and history. This special issue of Urban Planning is predicated on three of Lefebvre’s major works:

– The Production of Space (1974/1991)

Critique of Everyday Life (1981/1991)

The Urban Revolution (1970/2003)

It draws to a lesser extent on two other texts: Rhythmanalysis (published posthumously in 1992) and Introduction to Modernity (1962/1995).  Lefebvre’s ideas and approach to the investigation of cities and urban society have been taken up most vigorously in the fields of human geography and sociology and latterly architecture. Despite this, it is clear that Lefebvre’s five central concepts: abstract space, the spatial triad, everyday life, the right to the city and planetary urbanism provide powerful tools for the examination of urban planning, cities and urban society in the Global North and South. Urban planning first embraced Lefebvre’s ideas in the 1990s. Surprisingly then, it is only in the last ten years or so that Lefebvrian inspired research, across several aspects of urban planning has become widely accepted but is still emerging.

This special issue of Urban Planning seeks to contribute to and extend the debate regarding the application of Lefebvre’s ideas to the current challenges and opportunities of urban planning. Papers can cover a range of issues e.g.: governance, urban design, urban regeneration, environmental management, community participation, housing, policy making and evaluation, local/strategic planning, infrastructure, international planning, neoliberal urbanism, smart cities, land hunger, urbanisation, gentrification, urban poverty/inequality, the right to the city, new towns/cities, planning history, city management and the law. We welcome papers that present: new empirical research, critical reviews of current issues, theoretical discussions and developments and demonstrate a critical engagement with Lefebvre’s ideas and arguments.

Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper to this issue shall carefully read the Instructions for Authors and submit their full papers through the journal’s online submission system by 15 January 2018. Authors are also highly encouraged to send, as early as possible, an abstract to up@cogitatiopress.com for a first assessment of the submission.

Open Access: This journal has an article processing charge to cover its costs, so authors are advised to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees, and if their institutions wish to join Cogitatio’s Membership Program (institutional members enable their authors to publish without having to incur any publication fees). Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

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