Federico Ferretti, Anarchy and Geography: Reclus and Kropotkin in the UK – Routledge 2018

9781138488120Federico Ferretti, Anarchy and Geography: Reclus and Kropotkin in the UK – Routledge 2018.

This book provides a historical account of anarchist geographies in the UK and the implications for current practice. It looks at the works of Frenchman Élisée Reclus (1830–1905) and Russian Pyotr Kropotkin (1842–1921) which were cultivated during their exile in Britain and Ireland.

Anarchist geographies have recently gained considerable interest across scholarly disciplines. Many aspects of the international anarchist tradition remain little-known and English-speaking scholarship remains mostly impenetrable to authors. Inspired by approaches in historiography and mobilities, this book links print culture and Reclus and Kropotkin’s spheres in Britain and Ireland. The author draws on primary sources, biographical links and political circles to establish the early networks of anarchist geographies. Their social, cultural and geographical context played a decisive role in the formation and dissemination of anarchist ideas on geographies of social inequalities, anti-colonialism, anti-racism, feminism, civil liberties, animal rights and ‘humane’ or humanistic approaches to socialism.

This book will be relevant to anarchist geographers and is recommended supplementary reading for individuals studying historical geography, history, geopolitics and anti-colonialism.

Looks good, although my usual complaints about Routledge’s prohibitive pricing apply – and seem even more of a problem given the topic of the book.

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2 Responses to Federico Ferretti, Anarchy and Geography: Reclus and Kropotkin in the UK – Routledge 2018

  1. Pantelis Panteloglou says:

    One would say that the authors themselves, given the topic of the book, should have looked elsewhere for a publisher. This is what the term “contradiction” refers to 🙂

    • stuartelden says:

      I agree, though it is also important to recognise that there are sometimes considerations of which we, as outsiders, are unaware. But generally, yes, authors really need to explore options to avoid things like this.

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