Foucault, The Courage of Truth and the Cynics

Foucault’s lecture course The Courage of Truth from 1984 has now been published. I was incredibly flattered to be asked to write one of the blurbs for the back cover. Obviously my endorsement wasn’t to encourage people to read Foucault, so I took the opportunity to praise the work of the editor and translator – two crucial roles that are undervalued.

“In his powerful final course of lectures, expertly edited by Frédéric Gros and sympathetically translated by Graham Burchell, Foucault provides an explicitly political focus to his work on parrhesia. He offers readings of a range of texts, of which those of the Apology and the Cynics are especially insightful. It is impossible to read these lectures without an eye to the links between his work and his life, but Foucault’s focus remains on the material at hand and his long-running interest in the interrelations of truth, power and the subject.” – Stuart Elden, Durham University, UK

Unfortunately the word ‘Cynics’ in my quote has been italicised. This makes it look like (I think) the ‘Cynics’ was a book, like the Apology, when of course the Cynics were a group of thinkers that Foucault reads. Unfortunately the same mistake is on the book itself. I’ve asked that this be corrected for subsequent printings…

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1 Response to Foucault, The Courage of Truth and the Cynics

  1. Selim Karlitekin says:

    I friend of mine translated a philosophy article once, assistant of the publisher seeing that there is constant use of ”a priori” thought that there is something wrong, thought that ”a” is for indefinite and translated them into Turkish indefinite ”bir”, so it appeared ”bir priori” all over the text 🙂

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