Foucault and the Politics of Health: Collaborative research and activism – audio recording of UCL talk

The audio recording of my talk of 12 January 2016 to the Geography Department seminar, University College London is now available here. The introduction is by Tariq Jazeel.

“Foucault and the Politics of Health – Collaborative research and activism”

Concentrating on the early 1970s, this talk will discuss Foucault’s research and activist work concerning the politics of health. This is in three registers – the research in his Collège de France seminar; his work with Félix Guattari’s CERFI group; and his role in the activist organisation Groupe Information Santé. The sources for tracing his work in these areas are uncollected, sometimes anonymous, and often unpublished. The talk will draw on published reports and pamphlets, news sources, and material archived in Paris and Normandy.

The talk drew extensively on the work in Chapter Five of Foucault: The Birth of Power, but also discussed the various sources I’ve been using for my overall research on Foucault. There is some overlap with the talk I gave at the LSE late last year, but the specific focus on health and in particular the discussion of the Groupe Information Santé is new.

The LSE talk and other recordings are available here. For bibliographical details of the academic collaborative research work, see here; on the GIS here.

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with Tariq Jazeel, photo by Andy Fugard

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This entry was posted in Conferences, Foucault's Last Decade, Foucault: The Birth of Power, Michel Foucault, Politics. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Foucault and the Politics of Health: Collaborative research and activism – audio recording of UCL talk

  1. Pingback: Foucault and the Groupe Information Santé – a bibliography | Progressive Geographies

  2. Pingback: Foucault: the Birth of Power Update 11: clearing the decks and beginning to move from Foucault to Shakespeare | Progressive Geographies

  3. Pingback: Top posts on Progressive Geographies this week | Progressive Geographies

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